Fewer Households Include Children Living with 2 Married Parents

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Fewer Twin Cities Households Include Children According to Recent Housning Market Data what upscale home buyers really want


Due to more sophisticate housing data measurement tools and processes, it is now possible to identify children living with two parents who are not married to each other. It makes Minneapolis real estate demographics clearer.


In an article titled U.S. Families Shift as Fewer Households Include Children: Census, posted on August 27, 2013 by Reuters, a dramatic shift was made clear. "Since 1970, the portion of U.S. households that include families with two married parents and children fell by half, from 40 percent to 20 percent last year," summarized by recent data released by the Census Bureau.


Composition of Family Households Is Changing


The composition of U.S. households is dynamic and changing local neighborhoods. A long-term shift in family composition has decreased the percentage of children living with two married parents, while single-parent households have become more common for children. While the trends continues to grow, studies show that overall, children fare better that are fortunate enough to live in a household made up of two happily married parents. The formation of American households has implications for critical parental and economic resources. according to www.childstats.gov.

On a national level, homeownership among households with children fell 15 percent between 2005 and 2011 to 20.8 million, Census shows. One reason for the local decline is that Twin Cities Millennial generation homebuyers are opting to have fewer children and to have them later on in life. Furthermore, more youth are moving home to live with their parents after graduating from college; 36 percent according to a recent Pew survey. While that saves on living expenses, it limits their ability to build the credit histories they need to eventually get a mortgage or is deemed less ideal for starting their own family. Millennials indeicate a preference to be in their own household before including the responsiblity of running a housinghold including children.



A Change And Long-Term Shift in Household Formation


The composition of U.S. households is dynamic and changing local neighborhoods. A long-term shift in family composition has decreased the percentage of children living with two married parents, while single-parent households have become more common for children. While the trends continues to grow, studies show that overall, children fare better that are fortunate enough to live in a household made up of two happily married parents. The formation of American households has implications for critical parental and economic resources. according to the governments Child Stats website.


A household contains one or more people. Everyone living in a housing unit makes up a household. One of the people who owns or rents the residence is designated as the householder. To accomplish the task of examining family and household composition, The Census Bureau defines two categories of households: family and non family. We are also seeing a trend where more Twin Cities senior single-family households include children as grandparents are raising their own grandchildren more often.

A family household has at least two members related by birth, marriage, or adoption, one of whom is the householder.
A non- family household can be either a person living alone or a house holder who shares the housing unit only with non relatives—for example, boarders or roommates. The non relatives of the householder may be related to each other.



Key Findings Shed Light On How Households Include Children:


Sixty-four percent of households with children Sixty-four percent of children ages 0–17 lived with two married parents in 2012, down from 77 percent in 1980.

children dwell in the home In 2012, 24 percent of children dwell in the home with only their mothers, 4 percent lived with only their fathers, and 4 percent lived without the home made up of either of their parents.

children lived with two married parents Seventy-four percent of White, non-Hispanic, 59 percent of Hispanic, and 33 percent of Black children lived with two married parents in 2012.

children living with two married parents The proportion of Hispanic children living with two married parents decreased from 75 percent in 1980 to 59 percent in 2012, a staggering drop of 16 percent.

children lived with two unmarried parents Four percent of all children lived with two unmarried parents in 2012.

children in stepparent families Among children living with two parents, 92 percent lived with both of their biological or adoptive parents, and 8 percent lived with a biological or adoptive parent and a stepparent. About 70 percent of children in stepparent families lived with their biological mother and stepfather.

children who lived with two biological or adoptive parents Six percent of children who lived with two biological or adoptive parents had parents who were not married.

children living with one parent The majority of children living with one parent lived with their single mother. About 14 percent of children living with one parent lived with their single father.

children living with single fathers Some single parents had cohabiting partners. Twenty-six percent of children living with single fathers and 11 percent of children living with single mothers also lived with their parent's cohabiting partner. Out of all children ages 0–17, about 5.6 million (8 percent) lived with a parent or parents who were cohabiting.

children not living with either parent Among the 2.6 million children (4 percent of all children) not living with either parent in 2012, about 55 percent (1.5 million) lived with grandparents, 22 percent lived with other relatives only, and 22 percent lived with non-relatives. Of children in non-relatives' homes, 33 percent (193,000) lived with foster parents.

Older children living with single fathers Older children were less likely to live with two parents: 65 percent of children ages 15–17 lived with two parents, compared with 67 percent of children ages 6–14, and 72 percent of those ages 0–5. Among children living with two parents, older children were more likely to live with a stepparent and less likely to live with cohabiting parents.


Homes Where Children Are Living With Grandparents family composition Censues report


In releasing its findings, the Census Bureau noted the significant role of grandparents in children’s family formations in the home they live. In 2009, 7.8 million children lived with at least one grandparent, a 64 percent increase since 1991. Most commonly, but not conclusively, this meant living in the grandparent’s home. Additionally, it is very common for one or both of a child’s parents also dwell under the same roof. Children’s development and their economic well-being are influenced greatly by their living arrangements, the report’s authors comment. Donna Butts, executive director of Generations United, a group devoted to intergenerational programs and policies, acknowledged that financial pressures play a large role in shared living. He summarizes that the housing trend toward families choosing to live more often in multi-generational homes has been accelerated by the recession.

Many varrying influencers shape our American household formations. While married couples with children were the majority decades ago, now nearly 57 percent of U.S. households are childless. In 2012, about 29 percent included childless married couples and nearly 28 percent included people living alone. The numbers may reflect a number of reasons "why" our family household configurations are changing.

Butts commented, "If there’s anything good that’s come out of this economic time, it’s that we realize we need each other."


Additional Impacts When Children Grow Up Without Both Parents In the Home


According to Rice University, children who live with two married parents are less likely to struggle with weight problems. Research on family compositions by Kimbro and colleagues shows that "children living in a traditional two-parent married household are less likely to be obese (17 percent obesity rate) than children living with cohabitation parents, who have a 31 percent obesity rate. The obesity rate is also higher for children living with an adult relative (29 percent), single mother (23 percent) and cohabitating stepparent family (23 percent)".



Download the Census Bureau's August report on Changes in the Composition of Households: Fewer Household Include Children pdf

Download the National Association of Realtors Cash home purchases are high in July 2013 pdf



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Jenna Thuening, a home prices and market review Twin Cities residentail Realtor brings a reports on the change if household composition toward fewer households include children.


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